Featured TCKs

Featured TCK: my sister Melody

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So my last post told you a bit about how my oldest brother Nate felt about being a missionary kid growing up between multiple countries.  You can see my post entitled Featured TCK: my brother Nate. I asked my sister Melody to answer the same questions about her experience, and I was very excited to see how her answers related to Nate’s answers.


 

Melody is a wife, a mother of one adorable little girl, an artist, and a woman who loves to relax at home and travel only when necessary.  Here are her answers to my interview questions…

What is your last good book you read?  
I’m not quite finished yet, but I’m going to say Ender’s Game.  If you count audio books, then The Hobbit.
What is your favorite family/kids movie (Think Disney, Pixar, or other good family movies)?
I think Tangled.
What have you been listening to lately? 
I’m all about audio books right now.  But music-wise just a lot of the radio and my Mumford Pandora station.
If someone gave you a free plane ticket right now to visit any country in the world for 1 week, where would you go?
I’m sure this is the most cliche answer, but I think I would go to France and eat a lot of food.  Or possibly Thailand, but I’d probably need at least a month!
Give me your TCK life map:
I was in Thailand from birth to age 12 with a year or two spent in Canada during that time.
Then ages 13 to 27 have been in the US.
What reaction did people have when they found out you lived in Thailand?
When I first moved back here, Thailand wasn’t as well known as it is now.  No one seemed to know where I was talking about.  They kept thinking I had lived in Taiwan.
Name one thing that shocked you about America when you moved here (or did you pretty much get what you expected?):
In Thailand we weren’t poor, but when we moved to America we were for a little while.  Everything seemed so expensive compared to Thailand.  I remember seeing something on sale for twenty dollars and it might as well have been two hundred dollars.

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What was boarding school like for you?   

Am I glad that I was able to get a good education?  Yes.  And our dorm parents were amazing people, and I loved living with my friends.  Day to day, the dorm life was a lot of fun and we were able to go on so many cool outings and do so many fun things.  But it did leave some scars.  I started going when I was six, and I was the only family member at my school for the majority of the time.  My big brothers went to a different school in a different country, and my younger sister didn’t attend until my last year there.  I still feel sad when I think about how much I missed out on by not living with my family during those years.  So, the boarding school itself was a great place, but the first chance I got I left my friends and decided to home school.

What do you wish people knew about your TCK experience?  
It’s hard to believe that something can be so good and bad at the same time.  The TCK life is so lonely, but also so full of friends.  It is chock full of hellos and goodbyes, polarized cultures, losses and gains, rich experiences.  It is life condensed.  Two (or more!) identities in one person.  A TCK stranger may understand you in a moment better than your own spouse ever will.  Some days I feel I would like to trade my experience in for routine and normalcy, other days I cling to it.  I would never actually let it go.  Plus, I feel like it gives me a certain je ne sais quoi.
If you have any questions or comments for Melody, let me know.  I know that she’ll be more than happy to answer!

I am in the process of finding more TCKs (and spouses and siblings and friends of TCKs) to share their experiences on this blog.  Are there any other questions you would like me to add to this interview format?  Anything else you’re dying to know about other TCKs?

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8 thoughts on “Featured TCK: my sister Melody”

  1. Melody, I had NO IDEA!?! Is it rude to say you were so well adjusted that I never even thought that you had such a different life!?! I mean seriously, I just figured you moved from another local school. Thanks for sharing! 🙂

  2. “What do you wish people knew about your TCK experience?
    It’s hard to believe that something can be so good and bad at the same time. The TCK life is so lonely, but also so full of friends. It is chock full of hellos and goodbyes, polarized cultures, losses and gains, rich experiences. It is life condensed. Two (or more!) identities in one person. A TCK stranger may understand you in a moment better than your own spouse ever will. Some days I feel I would like to trade my experience in for routine and normalcy, other days I cling to it. I would never actually let it go. Plus, I feel like it gives me a certain je ne sais qui.”

    This hits “home” the experience of being a TCK! When one spends so much of our early lives straddling between cultures without the full grasp of the concept of identity until much older, it leaves us confused and dazed. However, in my own TCK and expat experience, I’ve been embracing the TCK profile for a long time now and just set out to change people’s perception on what it means to be a global citizen to whomever I meet.

    1. Well spoken Alaine, Thanks so much for sharing your experience! I completely relate to your decision to embrace our TCK experiences and use those experiences to help the people around us understand what it’s like to be a global citizen. Keep up the great work Alaine!

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